Archive for the ‘Finnegans Wake Audio Recording’ Category

the   Leave a comment

previous post on this blog was my last audio entry. I’ve reeled my way around Finnegans Wake.

I wanted to finish my audio project in time for James Joyce’s birthday (yesterday), as Joyce had a tradition of timing the end of artistic projects with his birthday.

In the coming months, as I listen closely to the audio files I’ve made, I’ll post occasional comments here. So please click back from time to time.

Meanwhile, here is the song “Finnegan’s Wake”.

Thanks for visiting.

Slange to you!

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Posted February 3, 2011 by R.H.H. Nisbet in Finnegans Wake Audio Recording

As the lion in our teargarten remembers the nenuphars of his Nile   1 comment

(1.4.75.1-1.4.83.5)

Burial of HCE in Lough Neagh

Posted February 2, 2011 by R.H.H. Nisbet in Finnegans Wake Audio Recording

Come on, ordinary man   Leave a comment

(1.3.64.30-1.3.74.19)

A good jibe at the “phallusaphist” in this reading (72.14).

See this link to Derrida and Nietzsche.

Posted February 2, 2011 by R.H.H. Nisbet in Finnegans Wake Audio Recording

Chest Cee! ‘Sdense!… you spoof of visibility in a freakfog,   Leave a comment

(1.3.48.1-1.3.64.29)

In this chapter I’ve:

Vibed with the “Eyrawygla saga” and his “exceedingly nice ear” (48.16-21).

Met Padre Don Bruno (50.19).

Lost the identity of “the body” in the fog of night stories “this scherzarade of one’s thousand one nightiness” (51.4-6)

Met a native of the “sisterisle” (Scotland?)

Been presented flat scenes like “a landscape from Wildu Picturescu… or some seem on some dimb Arras dumb as Mum’s mutyness” (53.1-3). A silent semblance of appearance that introduces the arras in Gertrude’s chamber in Hamlet. And perhaps the echo of Polonius (who fatally stood behind it) in the shadowy cry of “letate!” (Laertes) as a midnight hour is struck (53.20).

There is a shift to the waxy world of “Madam’s Toshowus” and our “notional gullery” (57.20-21)-  We are in London. “Longtong’s breach is fallen down” (58.10). There is a woman “callit by a noted stagey elecutioner in “a waistend pewty parlour” (58.34-36).

Yet there is still talk on the street of the “Irewaker” (59.26). And this tips into bad egg cracks (homelette, hegg).

This would make sense as an evening newscast is being related: “Earwicker’s version of the story filmed, televised and broadcast” (lii). Typically a newscast moves from international, to national, regional and then local news…

There is mention of  “the park” (60.24) and Caligula (Camus?). Before a switch to Sydney…

Then later on there is a wedding to the “lottuse land” (Ulysses ref?), “Emerald-illuim” and first pharoah, “Humpheres Cheops Exarchas” judge of the “common or ere-in-garden” (62.19-21).

There’s an attack. And a pub crawl around biblical symbols Blazes, Hell, Sun, Lamb (63.23-24) finishing in the “Ramitdown’s ship hotel” (63.25). Very funny.

In addition to Hamlet /Homelette, perhaps the song “This old man, he played one” is rolls around underneath this chapter?:

He played knick-knack on my thumb. (on a drum, on my tongue)
With a knick-knack,

paddy whack, (64.24)…

Now (to forebare for ever solittle ever solittle of Iris Trees   Leave a comment

(1.2.30.1-1.2.47.29)

Appreciate the joy of me on the Casio SA-8 keyboard, and singing the tune of “The Ballad of Persse O’Reilly”!

Posted February 1, 2011 by R.H.H. Nisbet in Finnegans Wake Audio Recording

(Stoop) if you are abcedminded, to this clay book   Leave a comment

(1.1.18.17-1.1.29.36)

Posted February 1, 2011 by R.H.H. Nisbet in Finnegans Wake Audio Recording

Sir Tristram, violer d’amores, fr’over the short sea   Leave a comment

(1.1.3.4-1.1.18.18)

Curious to see the order in which the “end members” of Joyce’s assemblage of characters are introduced in the first pages of FW.

The riverrun, past Eve and Adam’s to Howth Castle (3.1-3)

Sir Tristram’s re-arrival  (3.4)

Jhem or Shen (3.13)

The fall (3.15-21)

The park (3.22)

Iseut (4.14)

Finnegan, of the stuttering Head (4.18)

HCE – Haroun Childeric Eggberth (4.32) (–> Hush! Caution! Echoland! (13.5)

Mistress Kathe’s “museyroom tour guided by the deixic relation “This is that/ That is this” (8.9 – 10.23): a relational unity (Jackson, 1983; quoted in Ingold, Culture, Nature, Environment 50).

A chronological chiasmus: 1132 A.D; 566 A.D. (Silent) 566 A.D.; 1132 A.D. (13.34-14.15).

Jute and Mutt (and the dramatic form; 16.10-18.16)