Archive for February 2011

the   Leave a comment

previous post on this blog was my last audio entry. I’ve reeled my way around Finnegans Wake.

I wanted to finish my audio project in time for James Joyce’s birthday (yesterday), as Joyce had a tradition of timing the end of artistic projects with his birthday.

In the coming months, as I listen closely to the audio files I’ve made, I’ll post occasional comments here. So please click back from time to time.

Meanwhile, here is the song “Finnegan’s Wake”.

Thanks for visiting.

Slange to you!

Posted February 3, 2011 by R.H.H. Nisbet in Finnegans Wake Audio Recording

As the lion in our teargarten remembers the nenuphars of his Nile   1 comment

(1.4.75.1-1.4.83.5)

Burial of HCE in Lough Neagh

Posted February 2, 2011 by R.H.H. Nisbet in Finnegans Wake Audio Recording

Come on, ordinary man   Leave a comment

(1.3.64.30-1.3.74.19)

A good jibe at the “phallusaphist” in this reading (72.14).

See this link to Derrida and Nietzsche.

Posted February 2, 2011 by R.H.H. Nisbet in Finnegans Wake Audio Recording

Chest Cee! ‘Sdense!… you spoof of visibility in a freakfog,   Leave a comment

(1.3.48.1-1.3.64.29)

In this chapter I’ve:

Vibed with the “Eyrawygla saga” and his “exceedingly nice ear” (48.16-21).

Met Padre Don Bruno (50.19).

Lost the identity of “the body” in the fog of night stories “this scherzarade of one’s thousand one nightiness” (51.4-6)

Met a native of the “sisterisle” (Scotland?)

Been presented flat scenes like “a landscape from Wildu Picturescu… or some seem on some dimb Arras dumb as Mum’s mutyness” (53.1-3). A silent semblance of appearance that introduces the arras in Gertrude’s chamber in Hamlet. And perhaps the echo of Polonius (who fatally stood behind it) in the shadowy cry of “letate!” (Laertes) as a midnight hour is struck (53.20).

There is a shift to the waxy world of “Madam’s Toshowus” and our “notional gullery” (57.20-21)-  We are in London. “Longtong’s breach is fallen down” (58.10). There is a woman “callit by a noted stagey elecutioner in “a waistend pewty parlour” (58.34-36).

Yet there is still talk on the street of the “Irewaker” (59.26). And this tips into bad egg cracks (homelette, hegg).

This would make sense as an evening newscast is being related: “Earwicker’s version of the story filmed, televised and broadcast” (lii). Typically a newscast moves from international, to national, regional and then local news…

There is mention of  “the park” (60.24) and Caligula (Camus?). Before a switch to Sydney…

Then later on there is a wedding to the “lottuse land” (Ulysses ref?), “Emerald-illuim” and first pharoah, “Humpheres Cheops Exarchas” judge of the “common or ere-in-garden” (62.19-21).

There’s an attack. And a pub crawl around biblical symbols Blazes, Hell, Sun, Lamb (63.23-24) finishing in the “Ramitdown’s ship hotel” (63.25). Very funny.

In addition to Hamlet /Homelette, perhaps the song “This old man, he played one” is rolls around underneath this chapter?:

He played knick-knack on my thumb. (on a drum, on my tongue)
With a knick-knack,

paddy whack, (64.24)…

Voiceless in today’s globalised society   Leave a comment

Scottish Elevator Voice Recognition – ELEVEN!

Joyce would have LOVED this.

Posted February 1, 2011 by R.H.H. Nisbet in cultural studies

Tim Minchin, Tim Ingold, Lifeworld.   Leave a comment

Watching Tim Minchin after reading Deleuze was fun time-out… until his song “Not Perfect” turned my thoughts to Tim Ingold’s figure comparing Lévi-Strauss’s and Bateson’s views on mind and ecology. Sounds like Tim Minchin stands with Levi-Straus here.

But Minchin is also singing through spheres. Like centrifugal man!

“When you feel like you’re the smallest doll in a babushka doll”.

As Ingold observes, “the perception of the spheres was imagined in terms of listening rather than looking” (210; see Ingold’s figure 12.2 The Fourteen Spheres of the World). Ingold observes that visual perception involves light reflecting off the surface of things. Sound perception on the other hand place us at the experiential centre of a lifeworld, listening out. Tim Minchin starts “this is my earth, and I live in it”. He sings inwards Geosphere -> Bio-sphere -> Noosphere (213). And is bloody funny!!!

Thanks Tim and Tim!

Posted February 1, 2011 by R.H.H. Nisbet in cultural studies, Deleuze

Deleuze Comments on Finnegans Wake   Leave a comment

Here. He makes the connection to Dujardin’s oeuvre. I need to find out more about this…

Posted February 1, 2011 by R.H.H. Nisbet in Deleuze